A Final Farewell To Aretha Franklin After Her Death To Pancreatic Cancer

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A young Aretha Franklin, pictured in 1968, a year after her smash hit “(You Make Me Feel Like a) Natural Woman.”

African Americans have the highest incidence rate of pancreatic cancer – up to 59 percent higher than the incidence rates for other racial and ethnic groups.

Aretha Franklin died on Aug. 16, 2018, of pancreatic neuroendocrine cancer.The Pancreatic Cancer Action Network (PanCAN) is dedicated to fighting the world’s toughest cancer given that the disease is third leading cause of caner death in the United States and  soon to become the second leading cause by 2020.

“PanCAN mourns the loss of Ms. Franklin to pancreatic cancer, a disease with a five-year survival rate of just 9 percent,” said Julie Fleshman, JD, MBA, PanCAN president and CEO. “Additionally, African Americans have the highest incidence rate of pancreatic cancer – up to 59 percent higher than the incidence rates for other racial and ethnic groups. This is why our mission to double survival and find better treatment options is urgent.”

Franklin joins a growing list of other notable public figures, actors and musicians who’ve passed away from pancreatic cancer. PanCAN has an urgent goal to improve outcomes for patients battling the disease today and double survival by 2020. The organization attacks pancreatic cancer using a comprehensive approach focused on researchclinical initiativespatient services and advocacy.

Support the Pancreatic Cancer Action Network’s urgent goal to double survival by 2020. Follow the Pancreatic Cancer Action Network on TwitterInstagram and Facebook.

 
 

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